• Paulette Pinero

Asking for a Raise: Do's and Don'ts

Updated: Aug 7, 2020



Last week we talked about the steps you need to take before asking for a raise. Now you are informed and ready to have a conversation with your boss. When you feel nervous, remind yourself that you have done extensive research on your field, and a salary increase will significantly transform your life. You can do things to decrease your chances of successful negotiation, and we'll go through them below.

DON'T DO

Ask your manager during your check-in meetings or go to the HR director and start asking for more money.


DO

Determine the right time to make the request. Have you been in your role for a year or close to a year? Is there a Performance Review coming up, or did it already pass? Did the new Fiscal Year already start, or is it coming up soon? It's your right to have this conversation about your salary at any time, but these factors will affect the openness to grant your request. Plan your discussion closer to your work anniversary. Before you start a new role or job title, approximately two months before the start of a new fiscal year, or during your performance review meeting.

DON'T DO

Think about asking for a sum of money based on the amount of work you are doing.

DO

Write down three possible scenarios to bring to the negotiation discussion. Write them down and practice with a friend or family member. You have prepared for these scenarios during the research and self-reflection phase. A Leadership Coach will help you prepare for this conversation and guide you through situations.

DON'T DO

Send an email with your salary increase request without speaking with your manager.

DO

Schedule a meeting with your supervisor and express your request for salary negotiation. Let them know that you will be submitting the request in writing after the meeting but want to discuss it in person first. A virtual call works too! Provide context of your tenure, increased responsibilities, leadership, and commitment with the organization and present your option with the highest benefits and salary amount. Never say that you have other options! Let them know that you are willing to start the negotiation process.

DON'T DO

Leave it to your manager to remember everything you discussed.

DO

Your manager will likely have to consult the Human Resources department and verify any budget restrictions. After your meeting, send a follow-up email or give them a written letter with your explanation and formal request. Focus on facts, numbers, goals, impact, and your commitment to the organization.

DON'T DO

Giving up after your first request is denied and not continuing the conversation.

DO

Understand this is a process; the negotiation will take time and several meetings. Your first request will likely be denied, so be ready to negotiate with your second request and state that you want to make sure the negotiation is satisfactory. You did your research, so stay firm in your offer.

DON'T DO

Trust that your employer will start your new benefits package based on their word.

DO

Follow up every conversation and negotiation with an email and summarize the discussion. When you and your employer agree on an amount or benefit request to have the agreement in writing. The document needs to include the start date of the increase or benefits changes and any deadlines. I have lost tuition benefits in the past because I didn't request a period to use that money!

When there is a change in your responsibilities or job description, request that the new title and responsibilities are in writing. Make sure they add what types of supports, training, and coaching they will provide. Any agreement needs to be signed by both parties.

Once both parties have agreed and signed the document, you have completed your negotiation. It's time to celebrate and create a budget that works for you and your needs.


Photo by Cytonn Photography on Unsplash

46 views0 comments

Stay Connected

© 2020 LEAD Media LLC